[Trillium-l] GREEN

Adam Black epiphyte1 at earthlink.net
Tue May 10 05:08:58 CEST 2011


I can't offer any info on the inheritibility/genetic stability of green petals, but in one population of T. decipiens in the Florida panhandle different petal color forms abound, including what I consider green (not yellow bordering on green). I have watched some distinctive plants, and they return the same color each year. Here are some examples, all from the same locality:

Green: 
https://picasaweb.google.com/moropus1/Panhandle12410#5430725405391653090
https://picasaweb.google.com/moropus1/Panhandle12410#5430725532447379842

Lighter Green: 
https://picasaweb.google.com/moropus1/Panhandle12410#5430726092343214610

Pea-green:
https://picasaweb.google.com/moropus1/Panhandle12410#5430721505572301186

Green tinged with maroon: 
https://picasaweb.google.com/moropus1/Panhandle12410#5430724831337548546

Yellow:
https://picasaweb.google.com/moropus1/Panhandle12410#5430721983523069586

Yellow/Maroon:
https://picasaweb.google.com/moropus1/Panhandle12410#5430721868251743778

Brownish yellow:
https://picasaweb.google.com/moropus1/Trillums#5332798690894852226

Yellow plant and typical maroon plant together: 
https://picasaweb.google.com/moropus1/Trillums#5332811713133992322

Something is unusual about this particular site having a wide range of color forms mixed together, as a few other FL populations 20 or so miles away have nothing but typical maroon colored petals amongst hundreds of plants with no variation. 

Adam Black






-----Original Message-----
>From: "J.E. Shields" <jshields at indy.net>
>Sent: May 9, 2011 2:55 PM
>To: "Trillium Enthusiast Discussion List (and other Woodland plants)" <trillium-l at science.uu.nl>
>Subject: Re: [Trillium-l] GREEN
>
>Hi Russ and all,
>
>I will offer a couple of thoughts on green petals in Trillium or any other 
>plant.
>
>I would hypothesize that two genetic changes are needed to get a clean 
>green color in the petals of any but a white flowered species:  1. a 
>genetic change to suppress the normal pigmentation; and 2. a genetic change 
>allowing chloroplasts to develop with chlorophyll in the petals.  In fact, 
>and in my profound ignorance of how these things are regulated, it might be 
>on and the same change, acting at two separate genes.
>
>Some breeding experimentation is clearly called for.
>
>Jim Shields
>
>At 08:09 AM 5/9/2011 -0700, you wrote:
>>This is NOT about me being green with ENVY when I see pictures like Jim's 
>>of interesting Trilliums...
>>
>>This is a return of sorts to "questions" about color of petals and the 
>>possible genetics to consider for selection purposes.
>>
>>Several of you were very responsive and helpful when the topic was YELLOW 
>>and I am wondering if anyone has any thoughts, observations or experience 
>>with GREEN flowered Trillium.
>>.......
>>Kindest Regards,
>>Russ
>
>*************************************************
>Jim Shields             USDA Zone 5
>P.O. Box 92              WWW:    http://www.shieldsgardens.com/
>Westfield, Indiana 46074, USA
>Tel. ++1-317-867-3344
>
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