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hardy  Aroids)" <ARISAEMA-L at NIC.SURFNET.NL> Aroids)" <ARISAEMA-L at NIC.SURFNET.NL>
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From: Bonaventure Magrys <magrysbo at SHU.EDU>
Subject: Re: Arisaema triphyllum (was"weed")
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Perhaps the form ex Lithuania is a hybrid. The Asiatic, specifically
Himalayan, forms have given me heartbreak this year. I will stay away fro=m
the high altitude imports from now on. Triphyllum infusion may make them
more adaptable.
Bonaventure Magrys
Cliffwood Beach, NJ z6-7




"Jim McClements, Dover, DE z6" <JimMcClem at AOL.COM>@NIC.SURFNET.NL> on
07/10/2001 08:46:42 PM

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Subject:  Arisaema triphyllum (was"weed")


While A. triphyllum doesn't grow naturally on our property, it is
relatively
abundant in surrounding woodlands, and I still find it anything but a wee=d.
It never takes over any portion of the garden where it is planted, and th=e
more I see of various forms of it, the more I admire it.

The most striking forms are those in which the spathe has little or no
chlorophyll,and is essentially a black and white striper. I have one like
this which has a place of honor in the spring garden.

I also am growing the so-called white form, where there is a very pale,
whitish cast to the spathe, and a beautifully mottled stem. I have never
seen
this in the wild, and it came to me from a friend in Lithuania! He report=s
that it has never produced seed for him, nor has it done so in the two
years
it has been here. It does, fortunately, make offsets readily. Has anyone
seen
this form in North America?

The third "special" A. triphyllum was recently discussed here, namely, th=e
form with prominent white veins in the leaflets. One of these has been
christened as "Mrs. French", for a woman in Connecticut (I think) who fou=nd
it. However, similar forms have turned up in other places.

I'm hoping that some day my "black & white" (which is female) will flower
at
a time when "white veins" flowers as a male (which it has yet to do), and=I
can try a cross!

Familiarity should not necessarily breed contempt, and A. triphyllum sure
is
easier to grow than some of these Asiatic prima-donnas!

Jim McClements



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